Groove Digital Marketing Agency: Key Activities and Results as of August 15th

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In today’s post, as promised, I’m going to give you a look over my shoulder for the past week and share with you what I did, as well as the results we achieved. If you missed the last post, you can find it combined with the July income report here.

As always, my hope is that my transparency with you can be the fuel you need to achieve similar results in your own business.

Sound good? Let’s get into it.

Key Activities Since Last Update

During the past two weeks, here’s a summary of what happened:

  1. I created a new documented prospecting system for our target accounts
  2. I created a new LinkedIn group
  3. I wrote a new eBook for our target accounts
  4. I decided to move Groove’s blog from WordPress to HubSpot’s COS

Now that you’ve seen – at a high level – what the key activities were, let’s dive into some details.

New Prospecting System

Ever since getting back from Boston, I have been uber-focused on creating a better prospecting system for our Target100 accounts. The goal of the new system was to create a consistent 7 step process that was specific to what we are selling and who we are targeting. If you’d like to learn how to create a system like this, just purchase my Best Buyer Formula…because that is the exact process that I’m following.

Here’s an overview of what the process looks like for each target account.

Step 1: We use HubSpot’s Signals Insight to easily get their email address.

Step 2: I send them a LinkedIn connection request so that I can invite them to participate in the LinkedIn group that I created.

Now that we have their contact information and have made a connection request, we send an email.

Touch 1: The first email we send asks them a question that has nothing to do with our trying to sell them anything. In our case, we are asking them about something called an MDF program. MDF stands for Marketing Development Funds, and as each of these company is a Value Added Reseller for a large technology company, they all know what MDF is. When they reply, thanks to their email signature, in most cases, I now have their direct line.

Touch 2: When they reply, and many do, we either invite them to do a pre-interview for my podcast (if their site rocks), or, if their site/blog sucks, we offer one tip to improve conversions and ask them if they might be interested in hearing more ideas. If they say yes, I call them immediately. (HubSpot’s signals app alerts me via my phone to when they are reading my email.)

Touch 3: If they haven’t yet responded to my contact attempts, I send them another email with links to two blog posts on how to blog properly. I then follow up this email with a call and will leave voicemail if they don’t answer.

Touch 4 & 5: If they still haven’t responded, I will call twice more, but will not leave a message. I will also send an email at this point that either shares some more content, has a link to our new eBook landing page, or I will follow the advice in this post.

Touch 6: For this touch, I send them a link to a website diagnostics report that will score their site from a marketing perspective. I will also call to follow up this email and I will leave voicemail if they don’t answer.

Touch 7: This is my final attempt to get in touch with them. In this last email, I ask for their permission to close their file. I will also call them one last time.

Subject: Permission to close your file

Hi Name,

I’m writing to follow up on my voicemail. Typcially, when I haven’t heard back from a prospecct after a 6 or 7 attempts, it means they are really busy or aren’t interested. If you aren’t interested, do I have permission to close your file?

If you are still interested, what do you recommend as a next step?

Thanks for your help.

Why 7 Calls?

The reason I make this number of contact attempts is because a study by Leads 360 told me to. As you can see, 6 or 7 attempts is what is needed.

leads360_wp_call_attempt_study

My LinkedIn Group

About a week ago, I interviewed Josh Turner from LinkedSelling and during the interview (not yet published), he shared with me a case study for one of his clients. When I looked at the LinkedIn group that he created for them, it was quite active.

An active group is very beneficial for the group owner because with an active group, you have an engaged audience. Over the next few months, I’ll be curating content and stimulating discussion in my new group, as well as inviting every single one of my target account prospects to join it. The fact that I have a group just gives me another reason to email them that is not selling related.

New Lead Magnet

So far, all the lead magnets (eBooks that we offer for download) that we use at Groove were originally written by HubSpot and then rebranded with our branding. HubSpot allows partners to do this, so it’s a huge time saver.

Now that we are targeting the VARs of this large technology company with our outreach program, I realized that we needed a new eBook (lead magnet) that was written specifically for them.

Rather than write it from scratch, all I did was find past blog posts that would resonate with them and then use the content (with some tweaking) from these blog posts to produce the eBook. Total time invested to create it was only a few hours.

Moving Our Blog to HubSpot COS

In the past, I was against having my blog on HubSpot’s COS platform. The thinking was that I wanted to “own” the platform that all of my content resides on (WordPress).

After seeing data that told me that page load speeds on HubSpot’s COS were 2x as fast as WordPress, I started to reconsider my position. I then learned that by using the COS, I will gain access to additional features (smart content) and better reporting. I also learned that, should I ever want to, I can easily export all my content back to WordPress with a mouse click or two.

As of this writing, we are only a few days away from having the transition completed. I would have moved the entire site, but, that was going to be too costly, and, at least for my pages, I REALLY like the Enfold theme that I’m using. The advanced content layout editor is just KILLER.

Traffic & Leads

We’ve started to look at our traffic in much more detail in our monthly traffic reports. Our new dashboards are pretty impressive!

You can find all the details in our detailed July traffic report.

Additional Resources

What Questions Do You Have?

If you have questions about this post, or anything to do with marketing, please leave them in the comments down below. That way, I can look at the most commonly asked questions and write detailed blog posts on these topics in the future. If you don’t ask questions, it’s much harder for me to come up with ideas to write about, so please don’t be shy!

Now What?

If you liked this post and want future updates on our progress with how to start a marketing agency, just click the image below. If you’d like to get even more help and surround yourself with other agency owners, be sure and check out the Bright Ideas Mastermind Elite, which is my mastermind group for entrepreneurs running marketing agencies.

Hey, thanks for the info. Now what?

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  • Hi Trent, loving this series. Please keep going with it!

    It’s really interesting that it takes so many touches to have the best chance of getting through. I think being that persistent is counter-intuitive for a lot of people and causes them to give up too early.

    One thing I noticed from previous posts in this series — when you went from publishing around 3 posts per week to publishing 7 (?), your traffic increased, but certainly not by 100% (which is roughly the amount that your posting increased). In light of that, would you say that around 3 posts per week is the sweet spot of resources vs return?

    • Hey Damien,

      More content will always equal more traffic, HOWEVER, I think there is a point of diminishing returns and 3 posts per week is probably a good guess. Use the time you save to prospect 🙂

      • That makes sense. I noticed the Groove blog is still on WordPress rather than HubSpot. Are you still planning on migrating it? I can see a lot of pros and cons both ways. Personally I don’t like the mismatch between the design on the main site and the HubSpot blog templates, which frankly leave a bit to be desired after working with the latest WP themes. There are also the SEO issues of a subdomain, which Rand Fishkin talked about recently here: http://inbound.org/question/view/it-s-2014-what-s-the-latest-thinking-on-sub-domains-vs-sub-directories … Interested to see what you end up doing and what the outcomes are!

        • We are just a few days away from moving our blog into HubSpot’s COS. Page loads are MUCH faster than WP and we’ll get better analytics.

          Re the sub-domain vs sub-directory. Thanks for pointing that out. I’m asking our developer about how we can use a sub-directory instead.

  • canfernee

    Hi Trent,

    Thank you for sharing these updates, it’s very inspirational.

    It’s been a while since you last updated. Will you still be doing this in the near future?

    Thanks

    • I’m happy to hear that you have been enjoying the series. Updates in the future will be much less frequent as that actions that I’m taking now to attract clients haven’t really changed since my last few updates. In other words, there isn’t much new to tell.